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How Pittsburgh Builds Bike Lanes Fast Without Sacrificing Public Consultation

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Michael Andersen blogs for The Green Lane Project, a PeopleForBikes program that helps U.S. cities build better bike lanes to create low-stress streets.

Four months — that's how long it took Pittsburgh to announce, plan, and build its first three protected bike lanes.

One of the country's most beautiful (and probably still underrated) cities has proven this year that it's possible for governments to move fast without neglecting public outreach. Instead of asking people to judge the unknown, the city's leaders built something new and have proceded to let the public vet the idea once it's already on the ground.

That's part of the magic of the simplest protected bike lanes: unlike most road projects, they're flexible. The construction phase can come at the middle or the beginning of the public process rather than the end of it.

For a city full of hills, narrow streets and short blocks, building a great bike network isn’t easy, a point acknowledged by Mayor Bill Peduto in the above video.

"We have all of the detriments to building a bike system that people could argue," Mayor Bill Peduto says in the video above. "But we're still doing it. And we're going to beat every other city."

You can follow The Green Lane Project on Twitter or Facebook or sign up for its weekly news digest about protected bike lanes.

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