A Map of All New the Bikeways Built in Chicago This Year

A new bike lane on Milwaukee north of Addison. Photo: John Greenfield
A new bike lane on Milwaukee north of Addison. Photo: John Greenfield

During Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s first term in office, the Chicago Department of Transportation installed about 100 miles of buffered and protected bike lanes. In spring 2016 the mayor announced a more modest goal of installing 50 miles of bikeways by 2019.

Still, 2017 has been a fairly productive year for bikeway construction, with CDOT installing a total of 21.6 miles. These included:

  • 1.3 miles of protected lanes (green lines on the Streetsblog-created map below)
  • 1.4 miles of “neighborhood greenways” (brown)
  • 10.1 miles of buffered bike lanes (red)
  • 4.4 miles of non-buffered bike lanes (purple)
  • 1.5 miles of mixed dashed and non-buffered bike lanes (orange)
  • 2.9 miles of shared-lane markings, aka “sharrows” (blue)

As you can see from the chart at the bottom of this post, many more miles of existing bikeways were restriped this year, often as part of street resurfacing projects.

The new bikeways were distributed fairly evenly across the city from north-to-south. However, the West Side got little in the way of new facilities, other than a cluster of buffered and protected lanes near the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Illinois Medical District.

Note that the protected bike lanes that were installed this year – the green lines on Polk by the IMD and Loomis near the Chicago River – are actually curbside buffered lanes with flexible plastic posts. The posts represent an upgrade from standard buffered lanes, but don’t offer physical protection from cars.

Unfortunately, the proect to install protected bike lanes on Loomis near the Chicago River didn't include non-slip bridge plates. Photo: Steven Vance
Unfortunately, the proect to install protected bike lanes on Loomis near the Chicago River didn’t include non-slip bridge plates. Photo: Steven Vance

Also note that the Loomis project did not include installing non-slip plates on the metal bridge deck, which would have required recalibrating the counterweights of the bascule bridge. Despite many request for this safety upgrade from cyclists, it’s likely the bridge won’t get plates until the bridge undergoes a major overhaul.

Check out previous Streetsblog Chicago coverage of some of these projects:

Have you ridden any of these new bikeways? Let us know what you think in the comments.

Street

Start

End

Length

(mi)

Project Type

Month Complete

Lawrence

Austin

Central

0.5

MSL – Restriping

4

Lawrence

Chicago River

Western

0.6

BL – Restriping

4

Marshall

24th

19th

0.5

BBL – Restriping

4

Rockwell /  Melrose

Campbell

Addison

0.6

BL

4

26th

Halsted

King Dr

1.5

BL/BBL

5

83rd

Wentworth

Lafayette

0.2

BBL

5

Baltimore

Brainard

130th St

0.8

BBL

5

Elston

Western

Kedzie

1.5

BBL

5

Harrison

Ashland

Halsted

0.8

BBL

5

Root

Emerald

Wentworth

0.7

BBL

5

Root

Halsted

Emerald

0.1

BL

5

Damen

Potomac

North

0.4

BL – Restriping

5

Lincoln

Montrose

Leland

0.4

MSL – Restriping

5

Milwaukee

Canal

Clinton

0.1

BBL

5

Glenwood / Carmen

Broadway

Ridge

1.1

Neighborhood Greenway

5

Jackson

Halsted

Jefferson

0.3

BBL

5

Broadway

Grace

Clarendon

0.1

BBL

6

King

Marquette

51st

2.0

BL

6

55th

Cottage Grove

Lake Park

1.0

PBL/BBL – Restriping

6

Fullerton

Racine

Halsted

0.5

BBL – Restriping

6

Washington

Canal

Wacker

0.1

BL – Restriping

6

18th

Halsted

Indiana

0.8

BL/BBL – Restriping

6

55th

Lake Park

South Shore

0.3

MSL – Restriping

6

71st

State

Champlain

0.8

BL – Restriping

6

Wilson

Broadway

Clarenden

0.4

MSL – Restriping

6

Warren

Homan

Kedzie

0.3

BBL – Restriping

6

South Shore Dr

83rd

81st St

0.3

BL – Restriping

6

Milwaukee

Addison

Lawrence

2.0

SLM/BL

6

115th

State

Cottage Grove

0.6

SLM

7

Halsted

Ohio

Erie

0.0

BBL – Restriping

7

Halsted

Lake

Lake

0.0

BL – Restriping

7

Milwaukee

Willard

Augusta

0.1

PBL – Restriping

7

Southport

Clybourn

Belmont

1.3

BL- Restriping

7

Milwaukee

Hyacinth

Nagle

0.3

BBL – Restriping

7

Taylor

Aberdeen

Morgan

0.2

BL – Restriping

7

31st

Wentworth

LaSalle

0.1

PBL – Restriping

7

Hubbard

Peoria

Green

0.0

BBL – Restriping

7

Orleans

Wacker

Kinzie

0.2

BL – Restriping

7

Kedzie

Milwaukee

Avondale

0.7

BBL – Restriping

7

Southport

Belmont

Irving Park

1.0

BL – Restriping

8

Milwaukee

Lawrence

I-90

0.3

SLM

8

Ardmore

Broadway

Sheridan

0.3

Neighborhood Greenway

9

Milwaukee

Division

Armitage

1.5

BL

9

Fulton

Halsted

Jefferson

0.3

BBL – Restriping

9

Wabash

Roosevelt

9th

0.2

BBL – Restriping

9

Ardmore

Sheridan

Lakefront Trail

0.1

BL – Restriping

9

Argyle

Sheridan

Marine

0.2

BL

9

Cortland

Chicago River

Clybourn

0.3

BL – Restriping

9

Canal

Randolph

Lake

0.1

BL – Restriping

9

31st

Moe

Fort Dearborn

0.1

PBL – Restriping

9

Clybourn

Sheffield

Southport

0.7

BBL – Restriping

9

Division

Ashland

Milwaukee

0.1

BL – Restriping

9

Franklin

Lake

Wacker

0.1

BBL – Restriping

9

Illinois

Rush

McClurg

0.4

BL – Restriping

9

Illinois

State

Rush

0.1

BL – Restriping

9

Illinois

LaSalle

Dearborn

0.1

BL – Restriping

9

Kedzie

Wabansia

Moffat

0.1

BL – Restriping

9

Randolph

Columbus

Field

0.2

BL – Restriping

9

Roosevelt

Union

Ruble

0.0

BL – Restriping

9

State

25th

24th

0.0

PBL – Restriping

9

Southport

Irving Park

Clark

0.3

MSL – Restriping

9

Cottage Grove

115th

93rd

3.0

BBL

9

Loomis

Polk

Van Buren

0.3

BBL

9

Loomis

Eleanor

Cermak

0.5

PBL

9

Polk

Damen

Loomis

0.8

PBL

9

  • rwy

    What changes have been made to Ardmore? Haven’t noticed them.

    Speaking of bridges, Willamette has been doing work on some of their bridges. Looks like the Linden Ave bridge has concrete on the right side of the lanes with sharrows.

  • johnaustingreenfield

    According to CDOT, the contraflow bike lane on Ardmore has been extended west to Broadway.

  • Jeremy

    I think the Broadway/Clarendon intersection is fantastic. It seems very intuitive for all users. Maybe I have been lucky with the timing of no drivers behind me wishing to go north onto Clarendon while I veer left, continuing on Broadway.

    I also rode my bike west along Lawrence to get to the North Branch Trail recently, and was surprised at how it wasn’t stressful. Of course, that was at 7:00 am on a Saturday, so it may have been an outlier.

  • David P.

    My new commute has me using the Cottage Grove bike lane from 103rd to 93rd. It is well done, and makes this stretch probably much lower-stress than it would have been before. My commute is in the reverse direction so the heavier traffic is always against me. I do notice that in the morning, many drivers ignore the bike lane and treat it as a second car lane.

  • ChicagoCyclist

    Between Winthrop and Broadway, Ardmore is actually two-way. I believe that what was recently done was simply the installation of sharrows markings in both directions on Ardmore between Winthrop and Broadway … along with (I suppose) the extension of the countraflow bike lane from Kenmore to Winthrop…? Anybody know more / otherwise?

  • johnaustingreenfield

    “Between Winthrop and Broadway, Ardmore is actually two-way.” Correct. The contraflow lane previously ended at Kenmore, so it sounds like the contraflow lane has been extended one block west to Winthrop and then sharrows have been added on the two-way block between Winthrop and Broadway.

    If anyone wants to go out and snap some pics, I’ll buy you a beer at nearby Moody’s Pub in the near future.

  • Random_Jerk

    It’s all great, but I wish city would do a better job maintaining existing bike paths. There are some bike lanes that are being frequently used (for example, Dearborn north of Kinzie) where markings are already almost completely faded. I’t would be also nice if the paths interconnected better. Some of them end abruptly, or missing just 1-2 blocks in connectivity.

  • rwy
  • planetshwoop

    It’s usually pretty decent. I’d recommend looking at Carmen too, depending upon how far east you are. Lots of river paths that are pleasant.

  • johnaustingreenfield

    Thanks, I owe you a brew. So is there a new stretch of contraflow lane between Kenmore and Winthrop?

  • rwy

    Yeah, the third pic is the intersection of Winthrop/Ardmore and you can see the contraflow on the right.

    Anyways, now that I know about this stretch of Ardmore, I might consider using Broadway as an alternative to Winthrop and Kenmore. Don’t like speed humps that much.

  • Bridgeport Communter

    Thanks for the update on the Loomis bridge. I’d been meaning to find out if plates would be installed. Too bad they won’t! Will continue to take the sidewalk there, I guess.

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