Speeding Driver Jumps Curb, Fatally Strikes Pedestrian in West Pullman

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The intersection of 118th and Halsted, looking north. Image: Google Street View

A 45-year-old male pedestrian is dead after a motorist lost control of his vehicle and drove onto the sidewalk.

Andre Silas Jr., 19, was driving northbound on Halsted Street on Wednesday morning at about 11 a.m., according to Officer Janel Sedevic from Police News Affairs. At 118th Street, Silas ran into a light pole on the east side of Halsted, then struck the pedestrian, Sedevic said.

The victim, whose has not yet been identified, was pronounced dead on the scene, according to Sedevic. Silas, of the 1400 block of Stanley Boulevard in Calumet City, stayed on the scene and has been charged with driving on a sidewalk or parkway, and speeding not more than 30 mph over the speed limit, Sedevic said.

This section of Halsted is a broad roadway with four travel lanes plus turn lanes, which encourages speeding.

Fatality Tracker: 2015 Chicago pedestrian and bicyclist deaths
Pedestrian: 18 (6 were hit-and-run crashes)
Bicyclist: 2 (both were hit-and-run crashes)

Update 6/19/15: The Cook County medical examiner’s office has identified the victim as Larry Jordan, of the 11800 block of South Emerald.

  • Anne A

    My sympathy to the family and friends of the victim. This location is very close to the Major Taylor Trail. I’ve seen lots of crazy driving at and near the intersection of 119th & Halsted over the years. I’ve often been surprised that there aren’t more victims. Most people seem to be way when crossing the street around there. Few of us expect to get hit on the sidewalk.

  • 1976boy

    The driver “has been charged with driving on a sidewalk or parkway, and speeding not more than 30 mph over the speed limit”. Bad grammer. Does that mean he was speeding almost 30 miles over the limit? Why no homicide charge?

  • Alicia

    “Not more than 30mph over” sounds like legalese to me – maybe 30mph over the limit is a threshold at which fines or other penalties increase. Anyone know for sure?

  • BlueFairlane

    Though the wording is complicated, the grammar’s just fine. It means the driver was traveling at some amount above the speed limit, but was not traveling more than 30 mph above the speed limit. So if the speed limit here was 35 (I have no idea what it is), then his speed fell somewhere between 35 and 65. There’s no way of knowing based on the information provided where within that range he fell. It might have been 36, might have been 64.

  • Jeremy

    Based on the photo above and other photos on Google maps, it is ridiculous for Halsted to be 4 lanes wide when there are so few cars using the street.

    It seems like the city could experiment with road diets, bus lanes, and cycle tracks without much disruption, and, hopefully, use the results to silence the Chicken Littles of the city.

    Yesterday, the Slow Roll Chicago ride occupied the entire right south-bound lane on Michigan Avenue, and cars were able to move just fine in the other two lanes while the world kept spinning.

  • what_eva

    That is correct. >=30 mph over is a more serious charge

  • what_eva

    There’s no evidence in the article that would support a homicide charge (unless you were incorrectly assuming ~30 mph over the limit)

  • Anne A

    Halsted south of 87th St. is designed for speeding.