Latino Residents Are Being Displaced From Transit-Friendly Buildings in Albany Park

Activists call on Albany Bank to pressure Silver Property Group to negotiate with its tenants

Albany Park residents call on Albany Bank to rethink its relationship with Silver Properties Group. Photo: Lynda Lopez
Albany Park residents call on Albany Bank to rethink its relationship with Silver Properties Group. Photo: Lynda Lopez

On Saturday morning, a large crowd of Albany Park residents and tenants gathered in front of the CTA Brown Line’s Kimball Station. The Autonomous Tenants Union and Sunnyside Manor Tenants Union, with the support of 33rd Ward Working Families, were there to deliver a letter to Albany Bank and Trust Company in the hopes of sending a message to developer Ron D. Abrams of Silver Property Group, whose properties are partly funded through the bank’s mortgage loans.

In January 2017, Abrams purchased a 24-unit building in Albany Park at 3102 West Sunnyside, a short walk from the Kedzie Brown Line station. After collecting rent from January to July, Abrams issued every tenant in the building a 30-day notice, informing the residents that they had to leave their homes by the end of August.

This isn’t the first time Silver Property Group has faced off with tenants. Over the last few years, Silver has become a symbol of displacement in Albany Park due to a series of cases where he has purchased buildings and issued 30-day notices to the tenants, many of them at buildings with convenient ‘L’ access, which helps attract more affluent residents who commute downtown for work. In November, the ATU hosted a displacement tour of Albany Park with a focus on the real estate group.

In August 2014, Silver bought a 32-unit courtyard building at 3001 West Lawrence, a short walk from the Brown Line’s Francisco station. Tenants were then issued 30-day notices, a move 33rd Ward alderman Deb Mell supported, as the structure was deemed a “problem building” by her office. Some tenants decided to try to remain in their units, which included sending delegations to Silver’s office and bringing attention to the case through the local media. The tenants were ultimately unsuccessful in their efforts to remain in the building.

The activists met up in from of the Kimball station. Photo: Lynda Lopez
The activists met up in from of the Kimball station. Photo: Lynda Lopez

One resident, Patricia Cano, and her family were able to find an apartment at 4815 North Christiana, just north of the Kimball station. This building would later become the site of another mass removal of tenants. Silver bought the structure in 2016 and collected rent for five months before serving all tenants with 30-day notices. The residents again attempted to stay in their homes by holding press conferences and working with lawyers to build a discrimination case against Silver, arguing that they were being forced out because they were Latino, a charge that Abrams has denied.

The principal of Hibbard Elementary in Albany Park also got involved, since 30 of the children in the building were enrolled at the school at the time. Due to the increased pressure, 15 tenants were able to sign agreements with Abrams for extra time to remain and search for adequate housing elsewhere in the neighborhood.

In the case of the Sunnyside building, the ATU and Sunnyside Manor Tenants Union say they have tried to meet with Abrams to negotiate a similarly fair agreement. According to the ATU, Silver has subjected tenants to a slew of abuses to try to force them out, such as neglecting to maintain the property, verbal abuse, and intimidation by its staff and Abrams himself.

Four months after the 30-day noticed was issued, four tenants still remain in the building. One of them is Juan Pagan. When the building’s property manager first served him with his 30-day notice, Pagan didn’t want to take it. According to ATU, the manager subsequently threw the note in his face and told him to “Get the f— out.”

Residents and activists march to Albany Bank. Photo: Lynda Lopez
Residents and activists march to Albany Bank. Photo: Lynda Lopez

Another remaining resident is Mario Varela, 51, who has lived at the building for five years. He says tenants have endured “endless intimidation.” “Abrams has sent his maintenance staff to knock on our doors to ask us to leave at 6 a.m. or 7 a.m.,” he says. “They shouted at women answering the doors, showing no respect.” Varela adds that Silver has been unresponsive to attempts by tenants to speak about their case. “There are a lot of cockroaches, a lot of rats, and the plumbing is old,” he says. “They have never approached us to see what the conditions of the building are. They don’t know us, they don’t know who lives here, and they don’t know our needs.”

Unable to to get in touch with Abrams to voice their concerns, tenants decided to attempt to reach him through other means: his funding sources. Albany Bank and Trust Company has granted Abrams over $23 million in mortgage loans over the years, including the mortgage on the building at 3102 West Sunnyside, according to the ATU.

After congregating in front of the Kimball Brown Line station, the tenants and supporters crossed the street to make their way to Albany Bank. They intended to deliver a letter to the bank asking it to reconsider its relationship with Silver and to use its influence with Abrams to pressure him to negotiate with his tenants in good faith.

“In their initial requests [the tenants] did ask Silver to pay for the first month’s rent at their new apartments,” says Jake Marshall from ATU. “But the asks are still flexible and negotiable, as they have always been.”

When the residents and activists reached the entrance to the bank, a security guard locked the door. After a few minutes, Adam Steinback, senior vice president of the bank, came out to meet the group.

Adam Steinback from Albany Bank speaks with the activists. Photo: Lynda Lopez
Adam Steinback from Albany Bank speaks with the activists. Photo: Lynda Lopez

Antonio Gutierrez of the Autonomous Tenants Union asked him if there was anyone they could speak with about the letter. Steinback said the person who may be able to help the group was out of town, but that the bank would “review the letter.” When asked for a timeline for when the bank would meet with the group, Steinback was unable to offer a clear answer.

Noticeably frustrated by the encounter, residents discussed why their activism is important. “We are the community of Albany Park, [the bank] is supposed to serve the community, but they’re giving money to this guy who’s breaking up this community, this neighborhood,” Pagan said. “We are the people that live in this neighborhood and sooner or later, we aren’t going to be able to live here.”

Varela says that all residents want is to have a chance to speak to Abrams to attempt to leave with some dignity. “We are human beings, we aren’t objects, we aren’t animals,” he says. “I ask for them to respect us because they live off our money. We ask for respect, that they respect our families, and to respect us like people.”

Silver Property Group did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Update 1/2/18: The post previously referred to the removal of tenants via 30-day notices as evictions. However, this does not fit the legal definition of an eviction, which only occurs after a tenant is taken to eviction court and the judge or jury decides in the landlord’s favor. The post has been updated accordingly.

  • dude if you think having basic compassion makes me a liberal that’s just sad. I’m very much a neoliberal with a background in economics. Almost all my comments on Streetsblog are AGAINST bad regulation and for development. I draw the line at things that have what economists call negative externalities.

    Your ideas about race and welfare don’t hold up when you look at large scale data. In countries where single parenthood is not associated with *poverty* there is no correlation with crime or other negative indicators. You’re missing the poverty forest for the trees. The idea that getting the kids out of poverty making a difference in economic growth, crime, etc. came from conservative economics. Also single parenthood failed to drop with welfare reform in the US even though that was one of the intentions of the reform.

    Evictions are a market failure with widespread negative effects on society. It’s not liberal. It’s just economics.

  • Dale_Doback

    My comments weren’t about “race and welfare”, quite the opposite … but I guess you glossed over the fact I called out white families, too. Hmmm, I wonder why that is? Welfare reform??? What welfare reform, our system is as broken as ever, and the partisan divide is only growing more and more each year on issues like this. This entire conversation has nothing to do with “compassion.”

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Housing Activists Vow to Fight Evictions of Logan Square Tenants for New TOD

|
Yesterday morning dozens of community residents and members of the Autonomous Tenants Union, Somos Logan Square, and Grassroots Illinois Action joined tenants of the 2340 N. California building in Logan Square as they announced their plans to fight their impending eviction. Current landlord Francisco Macias plans to sell the two-story, mixed-use structure, located a few […]

New Law Could Pre-Empt Parking Lots Along Albany Park’s Main Streets

|
A proposal to build a suburban-style Walgreens at the busy corner of Lawrence and Kimball avenues in Albany Park, across from the Brown Line’s terminus, has sparked a proposal to introduce Pedestrian Street designations to the lively, diverse neighborhood. 33rd Ward Alderman Deb Mell has expressed her disapproval of the design, requesting a more walkable store […]

P-Street Designation for 33rd Ward Business Strips Moves Forward at City Hall

|
A few months ago, a proposed suburban-style Walgreens, across the street from the Kimball Brown Line station in Albany Park, inspired a campaign to ban car-centric development in the neighborhood’s vibrant retail districts. Now, an ordinance to officially classify stretches of Montrose, Lawrence, and Kedzie in the neighborhood as Pedestrians Streets, or P-Streets, is moving forward […]