Man Killed in Little Village Was 3rd Vehicular Homicide Victim of 2014


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The 4000 block of West 26th Street.

A Brighton Park man who was beaten and then run over by a motorist early Sunday morning was the third victim of a vehicular homicide this year.

On Monday, April 28, Darrell Cooper, 41, intentionally struck and killed Artez McBride, 20, in South Austin following a dispute, police said. That same week, on Saturday, May 3, another driver used his vehicle as a murder weapon in McKinley Park. Antonio Mendez, 24, was fatally struck following an argument on the 1800 block of West 33rd Place, by an SUV driver who fled the scene.

Last Sunday at about 5:35 a.m., Victor Mendez, 23, was involved in an altercation on the 4000 block of West 26th Street in Little Village, according to Officer Bari Lemmon from Police News Affairs. Following an exchange of gang slogans, assailants beat Mendez, who lived nearby on the 3100 block of West 41st Street, police said.

One of the attackers then got into a car and made a U-turn, running over Mendez, according to Lemmon.The driver fled the scene.

Mendez was pronounced dead at the scene, according to the Cook County medical examiner’s office. An autopsy conducted on Monday found that he died of multiple injuries following an assault, and the death was ruled a homicide, according to the medical examiner’s office.

No one is in custody, Lemmon said. Area Central is investigating the case.

Fatality Tracker: 2014 Chicago pedestrian and bicyclist deaths

Pedestrian: 19 (6 were hit-and-run crashes)
Bicyclist: 4 (1 was a hit-and-run crash)

  • Wewilliewinkleman

    These are very sad cases. It is a stretch however to consider these deaths as pedestrian deaths as both of these cases are the result of criminal activity unrelated to the use of the road/street.

    How would road diets, longer walk signs, traffic bump outs, slower speed limits, speed bumps and speed tables improve situations like these?

    In the one earlier this year, the pedestrian death was the result of the man trying to take away the keys of a drunk driver by reaching in the drunk’s car. He was pushed under the wheels.

  • We cover vehicular homicides, because they’re one of the many problems caused by cars being the primary form of transportation in the U.S.

  • oooBooo

    That’s the sort of argument being used to push for a ban of pointy kitchen knives in the UK. If only these weren’t a primary kitchen tool….

    Of course people who are pushed (or intentionally jump) in front of buses or trains also count as transit deaths, right? What about people murdered by their fellow passengers? Is transit policy going to be driven by murders and suicides? What about murders on trains using long pointy kitchen knives? :)

    There have been news stories of a toddler running out into traffic being struck and killed by a bus, suicide by train, a shooting at a bus stop, an accidental shooting on a bus with a found gun, and more in and around Chicago this year. Anyway, these aren’t covered here except an occasional headline summary mention best I can tell and certainly are not covered as a way to set transit or transportation policy. Nor should they because in most cases they’ll lead to poor solutions.

    By distorting the view with murders and other things it destroys the ability to come up with good practical and technical transportation solutions. Instead politically distorted data leads to politically driven solutions.

  • We did cover the story of the girl who was fatally struck by a bus driver in South Shore: http://chi.streetsblog.org/2014/05/27/young-girl-fatally-struck-by-cta-bus-driver/

    We generally don’t cover apparent suicides by train. Nor do cover crime that happens at transit stops or on buses and trains — crime can occur anywhere. Exceptions include types of crime that are more-or-less unique to transit, and situations where fear of crime is discouraging people from taking transit.

  • oooBooo

    Under that same rational, murders where an automobile is the weapon would also be discarded.

  • cjlane

    “How would road diets, longer walk signs, traffic bump outs, slower speed limits, speed bumps and speed tables improve situations like these?”

    Of course they wouldn’t. The only thing that would work is making cars basically non-existent. Those mooks used what was handy as the implement of their crime–it just happened to be a car.