Today’s Headlines

  • CTA Won’t Pay Cubic Until Ventra Problems Fixed, Delays Switchover (Tribune, Sun-Times)
  • Divvy Gets Federal Funding for 75 More Stations, for a total of 475 (Sun-Times)
  • 1 Killed, 5 Injured in 3 Separate Dan Ryan Crashes (DNA)
  • Dispatcher Suspended for Mishandling 911 Call From Driver Who Drowned (Tribune)
  • Western/Belmont Overpass Won’t Be Coming Down Until 2015 (DNA)
  • Actually, Google’s New West Loop Home Isn’t More Transit-Friendly (Atlantic Cities)
  • League of American Bicyclists Thanks Klein and Sadik-Khan for Their Service
  • More Kudos for Klein from a Bike Law Firm (Keating)
  • A Look at Divvy Rebalancing Strategies (DNA)
  • Woman’s Angry Note to Bicycle Thief Prompts Man to Buy Her a New Bike (CBS)

Get National Headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • Anonymous

    Divvy being expanded to 75 more stations in addition to the remaining 100 is pretty much the best news ever.

  • Anonymous

    New York City has approximately 3.07 times more population than Chicago. To match the number of bicycles per population that the Divvy bicycle sharing will have in the city of Chicago next year, New York City would need about 14,582 Citi Bikes.

  • Anonymous

    The idea that the Divvy van drivers drive around looking for stations to rebalance seems insane. I would think there would always be someone hooked into the system to identify what stations are full or empty.

    A cool article though; it’s fascinating to think about how the system works.

  • Bryan

    Yeah, the quote about driving around looking for full/empty stations seemed rather ridiculous given the technology of the system. The system also doesn’t seem very efficient is they’re rebalancing 1000-1300 bikes a day. Seems there are around 8,000 trips a day on average. So every 6-8 rides results in a rebalance.

  • Bryan

    When is Divvy going to make their data readily available? What’s the hold-up? NYC has a link right on their site for system data. Heck, when Columbus Ohio (also a Alta system) has system data available on their site and they launched a month later than Divvy.

  • Anonymous

    Yikes.

  • Tom Hagglund

    Driving around aimlessly, looking for stations to rebalance would be ridiculous, if it were true. It isn’t. I’m one of the Divvy rebalancers. I’m in constant contact with a Divvy dispatcher, via cell phone. I don’t put the van in motion without knowing which stations I’m heading for and how many bikes I’m either picking up or dropping off at each. I use the Android CycleFinder app to assist me in locating unfamiliar stations, or to give me an overall picture of my area (North Side, Loop, Streeterville, Milwaukee Corridor, South Side, West Loop, etc.) when talking to the dispatcher. Much of the rebalancing is proactive, not reactive: on Sunday nights, when I work, I unload Loop stations and load up stations near Union Station & Ogilvie, in anticipation of Monday morning commuters hopping off trains, grabbing bikes and heading into the Loop, where they’ll need empty stations to dock. I believe the opposite rebalancing strategy is employed late weekday afternoons, when office workers will want many bikes close by and will need empty docks at transit centers. Beyond that, you aim to balance most stations 50/50 bikes to empty docks, and do the best you can during your 6 hour shift.

  • Anonymous

    Nice. Maybe the comment was misunderstood or taken out of context.

  • Anonymous

    “The system also doesn’t seem very efficient is they’re rebalancing 1000-1300 bikes a day.”

    ‘not very efficient’ is pretty charitable.